Official Boundaries of the Elbert Triangle

Official Boundaries of the Elbert Triangle

 The Elbert Triangle is a fairly large section of the state of Colorado encompassing areas of Douglas, El Paso, and Elbert Counties.

While close in proximity to major metropolitan areas, it is sparsely populated and generally unknown to residents of Denver, Castle Rock, and Colorado Springs. Not the tourist attraction of the mountains of the front range, the Triangle boasts altitudes in excess of 7,000 feet, towering over the Mile-High city. The area is home to vast numbers of majestic Colorado wildlife including Elk, Deer, Pronghorn, Wild Turkey, Bobcats, Mountain Lions, and Black Bears in addition to dozens of species of birds. Much of the geological feature know as the Palmer Divide is included in the Triangle creating some of the most spectacular weather events in the state.

Scenic and bucolic in nature, the area harbors a dark side. Modern communication and navigation devices based on GSM, CMDA, 3G, 4G, 5G, GPS, including Google Maps, Bing, Tom-Tom Go, etc. are not merely unreliable, they out right lie. Less modern communication and navigation tools including magnetic compasses, RADAR, and even landlines are simply useless in many situations. Disorientation and a slight sense of isolation and vertigo are common to visitors entering the triangle for the first time.

If you find yourself in the midst of a Bomb Cyclone and your smart device tells you to proceed East out of Elbert on County Road 98 to your destination of St. Louis, MO 815 miles ahead, STOP. The advice of your smart device is about to trigger a natural selection event.

If you find yourself in the middle of the Elbert Triangle dazed and confused, use the Force to navigate to HI-TEST where we will be delighted to help you find your way out.

While merely entering he Elbert Triangle can pose serious risk to individuals, livestock and aircraft are of particular concern. DO NOT RISK BRINGING A BOAT THROUGH THE TRIANGLE.